Category Archives: Latest Screening

Imam and I

Imam and I, a documentary about the life and death of Imam Haroon, will be shown in Cape Town at the Labia on Orange cinema on Sunday 27 November at 12:00 noon.

On behalf of While You Were Sleeping and the Imam Abdullah Haroon Education Trust (IAHET), you are cordially invited you to a screening of The Imam and I, a feature-length documentary directed by Khalid Shamis. The film illuminates the life, death and legacy of Imam Haroon, an anti-apartheid activist who was killed in detention in 1969, after being pronounced a terrorist by the security police.

The screenings will be followed by a facilitated audience discussion and Q&A session with Khalid Shamis, the film’s director.

 

Tickets are R20 and can be reserved by calling The Labia at (021) 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

This event is presented by the Imam Abdullah Haroon Education Trust, the Labia and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.

Contacts:

The Labia:
021 424 5927
www.labia.co.za

The Imam Abdullah Haroon Education Trust:

www.iahet.com

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The Freedom to Create Documentary Film Week

The Freedom to Create Documentary Week showcases some of the best international documentary films entered in the 2011 Freedom to Create Prize and will take place at The Labia Cinema on Orange Street in Cape Town, South Africa from the 14th to the 20th of November 2011.

 

Established in 2006, Freedom to Create is an international organisation that supports programmes and projects around the world that unleash people’s creativity and The Freedom to Create Prize celebrates the courage and creativity of artists who use their talents to build social foundations and inspire the human spirit. This year’s prize winners will be announced at an awards ceremony and concert at the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens on 19 November 2011. As part of the celebrations, we will be screening a selection of films to celebrate this year’s best film entries.

 

Tickets can be reserved by calling The Labia at 021 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

 

The programme:

 

Son of Babylon

 

Monday 14 November
8.15pm

 

Northern Iraq, 2003. Two weeks after the fall of Saddam Hussein. Ahmed, a 12-year-old boy begrudgingly follows in the shadow of his grandmother. On hearing news that prisoners of war have been found alive in the South, she is determined to discover the fate of her missing son, Ahmed’s father, who never returned from the Gulf war. From the mountains of Kurdistan to the sands of Babylon, they hitch rides from strangers and cross paths with fellow pilgrims on all too similar journeys. Struggling to understand his grandmother’s search, Ahmed follows in the forgotten footsteps of a father he never knew. This journey will lead the boy to come of age. Son of Babylon raises awareness about Iraq’s one million and more missing people who, having faced death at the hands of a murderous regime, were at risk of being forgotten by history. This film also carries deep and hopeful messages asking us to think about how to deal with our unresolved issues from the past in order to move forward towards true peace and reconciliation.

 

Strangers No More and Teta, Alf Marra

 

Tuesday 15 November
8.15pm

 

Strangers No More, winner of the 2011 Best Documentary Short Subject Oscar, tells the story of the remarkable Bialik-Rogozin School in Tel Aviv, where the pupils include 750 immigrants and refugees from 48 countries and every known religion. The film follows three children who fled their homelands in Darfur, South Africa and Eritrea. Over the course of 15 months, the film portrays their struggle to forget the past and rebuild their lives in this very rare community, where truly no one is a ‘stranger no more’.

 

Teta, Al Marra is a poetic documentary about a feisty Beiruti grandmother, bringing together a grandfather, grandmother and grandson in a playful magic-realist film that aims to defy both a past death and a future one. It documents the larger-than-life character of Teta Kaabour, her tales of the Beirut of her past and her imaginings about what awaits her after death. The film documents this very personal and cultural heritage and presents a unique view of Lebanon’s norms, sensitivities and aspirations.

 

Enemies of the People

 

Wednesday 16 November
6.15pm

 

The Khmer Rouge ran what is regarded as one of the twentieth century’s most brutal regimes. Yet the Killing Fields of Cambodia remain unexplained. Until now. In Enemies of the People the men and women who perpetrated the massacres – from the foot-soldiers who slit throats to the party’s ideological leader, Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two – break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen. Unprecedented access from the top to the bottom of the Khmer Rouge has been achieved through a decade of work by one of Cambodia’s best investigative journalists, Thet Sambath. Sambath is on a personal quest: he lost his own family in the Killing Fields. The film is his journey to discover not how but why they died. In doing so, he hears and understands for the first time the real story of his country’s tragedy. After years of visits and trust-building, Sambath finally persuades Brother Number Two to admit (again, for the first time) in detail how he and Pol Pot (the two supreme powers in the Khmer Rouge state) decided to kill party members whom they considered ‘Enemies of the People’.

 

The Lost Girls of South Africa

 

Thursday 17 November
6.15pm

 

A child is raped in South Africa every three minutes. The Lost Girls of South Africa is a timely and revealing feature-length documentary that offers a privileged glimpse into what life is really like for young girls growing up in South Africa.  It follows the stories of four girls, aged 11-13, who become victims of child rape, looking at the experience and its aftermath through their eyes and in their words. The girls involved in this film, along with their mothers, were all extensively consulted about the implications of taking part in this film, and being identified. It was explained to them that while the film would not be sold to South African television, it was still likely that their pictures would be accessible on the internet in SA. We were very clear about this, but they were equally clear that they had a right to tell their story, and wanted to, in order to try to reduce the likelihood of it happening to other girls.

 

All proceeds from the screening of The Lost Girls of South Africa will be donated to The Lost Girls Fund, set up by the makers of the film to provide viewers an opportunity to directly help the girls in the film. Find out more at www.lostgirlssa.org

 

I was Worth 50 Sheep

 

Friday 18 November
6.15pm

 

I Was Worth 50 Sheep is the story of a brave girl Sabere, and her struggle for life. When she was just ten years old she was sold to a man forty years her senior. After seven years of confinement and abuse, she escaped to find temporary refuge in a
women’s sanctuary. The camera picks up Sabere at the point where she has re-made contact with her family. This is the story of a courageous young Afghan girl, fighting hard for her fundamental rights. The film gives a voice to the voiceless – women who continue to suffer from violence, poverty and illiteracy in their country.

 

Kinshasa Symphony

 

Saturday 19 November
1.45pm

 

Kinshasa Symphony is a study of people in one of the world’s most chaotic cities, doing their best to maintain one of the most complex human endeavours – a symphony orchestra. It is a film about the Congo, the people of Kinshasa and the power of music. The film documents the story of people achieving great things under the most difficult of circumstances. It is a measured, funny and lyrical film which portrays issues in the DRC such as poverty, poor housing and healthcare, while reminding us that the problems in the country are certainly not caused by deficiencies in its people. The film’s portrayal of Africans as heroes rather than victims has had a hugely powerful impact on many.

 

War Don Don

 

Sunday 20 November
6.15pm

 

In the heart of Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, United Nations soldiers guard a heavily fortified building known as the “special court.” Inside, Issa Sesay awaits his trial. Prosecutors say Sesay is a war criminal, guilty of heinous crimes against humanity. His defenders say he is a reluctant fighter who protected civilians and played a crucial role in bringing peace to Sierra Leone. With unprecedented access to prosecutors, defence attorneys, victims, and, from behind bars, Sesay himself, War Don Don puts international justice on trial for the world to see – finding that in some cases the past is not just painful, it is also opaque. The international court in Sierra Leone will be the first major war crimes tribunal to conclude cases since the Nuremberg trials. This film gives us an insight into the court, allows the opportunity for a dialogue to emerge, assessing the ways in which the system is currently run, and asks us to find ways to improve it.

 

All screenings will be followed by a facilitated audience discussion.

 

Tickets can be reserved by calling The Labia at 021 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

 

This event is presented by Freedom to Create, the Labia and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.

 

Contacts:

 

Freedom to Create:
www.freedomtocreate.com

 

The Labia:
021 424 5927

 

While You Were Sleeping:
Andreas Späth
084 749 9470
Andreas_Spath@yahoo.com
www.ftcdocumentaryweek.wordpress.com

The Eco Kids Film Initiative Environmental Film Festival for Kids

The Eco Kids Film Initiative Environmental Film Festival for Kids: and Action!!!

Films FOR kids!

Through films that are entertaining, educational, and above all inspirational it is EKFI’s goal to inspire real change through the children of today and generations to come by promoting a proactive strategy to environmental awareness through film as medium.

Each of the films has been selected for their strong environmental theme by a panel consisting of parents, childhood experts, environmental educators and conservationists. We have taken great care to ensure that the films that have made the final selection speak positively to children of diverse ages, backgrounds and cultures and are made for children rather than about children.

Format: Two parallel screening sessions of a selection of short films, taking place daily from 10am lasting no more than two hours.

Who: The two sessions are for the age groups 7-12 year old and 13-17 year old. (Parents are welcome to attend too)

  • Please note that each screening will be followed by a Q&A session guided by a facilitator. Due to the nature of these sessions we cannot guarantee a specific end-time. However, the entire programme will not take longer than two hours and will be completed by 12pm at the latest.

When: 3 – 7 October 2011; 10am-12pm

It’s a great activity for the school holidays.

Where: Labia cinema in Orange street, Cape Town

Cost: R20 a ticket

Book tickets through the Labia: 021 424 5927

  • Please note that The Book Lounge will be selling environmental books for kids and the whole family at the festival so be sure to bring your pocket money

Monday, 3 October, 10am: GLOBAL WARMING

Facilitators: 350.org and Hearth Heritage

Join in as we watch some great films to learn about the effect that global warming is having on the planet and its inhabitants. 350.org and Hearth Heritage will also be telling us what we can do at home and at school to minimize the effects.

Tuesday, 4 October, 10am: ENERGY

Facilitators: Koeberg Alert Alliance and Project 90×2030

Today’s films are all about energy in South Africa and the impact that various energy sources have on the environment. We also take a look at how the Johannesburg zoo, Durban botanical garden and our very own Two Oceans Aquarium are using renewable energy sources.

Wednesday, 5 October, 10am: POLLUTION AND LITTER

Facilitators: UCT Green Campus Initiative

Through a series of local and international animated and live-action films we come to grips with how our throw-away lifestyle impacts the environment, the people around us and our own health. UCT Green Campus Initiative will be inspiring us by sharing some of the things that they do on campus to create awareness.

Thursday, 6 October, 10am: WATER

Facilitators: Greenpeace Africa and TBA

Through a series of local and international animated and live-action films we learn more about that thing that makes up 75% of our bodies, water!.. and its health and conservation. We also learn how our actions on land affect the creatures living in the water. Today’s films not only address fresh water, but also its salty counterpart in the oceans.

Friday, 7 October, 10am: WILDLIFE AND CONSERVATION

Facilitators: Landmark Foundation and Nature Network

From the scary vulture to the cute penguin, today we learn some fun facts about wildlife and how to conserve our furry and feathery friends and their natural habitats. The films will tell us the stories of some amazing people in South Africa and the world that are doing important and exciting work in the area of conservation. Joining us will be Kate from the Landmark foundation who works with predator conservation. Nature Network will be helping us understand our role in the ecosystem.

Saturday 8 October, 11am: Story time at the Book Lounge

For the younger ones: We Love you Earth Storytime

Age: 3-8

Cost: Free

Where: The Book Lounge, c/o Roeland and Buitenkant Street

The Book Lounge will be hosting an Eco Storytime. They will be reading stories that evoke the sense that we should protect our planet. We will also be adding well-wishes to a Milkwood tree that we have purchased to be planted. For more information please visit www.booklounge.co.za or contact the shop at 021 462 2425.

EKFI is brought to you in partnership with:

While You Were Sleeping:

While You Were Sleeping is a Cape Town-based non-profit collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentary films with important social and environmental messages to South African audiences.

Hearth Heritage:

Hearth Heritage is a place to tell stories, a place to smell the flowers, a place to learn new things from interesting new people. People may be different, with different languages, different types of food, and different ways of thinking about the world, but we all live on the same earth and everything we do affects the earth and all the living beings who call it ‘home’. At Hearth we tell our stories, stories about our earth, and what we find special about it, our favourite animals, our favourite plants, our favourite, most beautiful river or mountain. We share these stories with each other so that we all may learn how special our earth is to everyone, maybe not always in the same way, but always special. Come and share your stories about why earth is special to you, come and sit and play together, come hear new stories and fun new facts. Come and join us at Hearth Heritage, we’d love to hear your story.

EKFI is brought to you in collaboration with:

350.org: is building a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis. The online campaigns, grassroots organizing, and mass public actions are led from the bottom up by thousands of volunteer organizers in over 188 countries. To preserve our planet, scientists tell us we must reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere from its current level of 392 parts per million to below 350 ppm. But 350 is more than a number—it’s a symbol of where we need to head as a planet. 350 means climate safety.

Greenpeace: is celebrating its 40th birthday this year. Greenpeace is an independent environmental organization with the largest global presence. Greenpeace has offices in more than 40 countries and on all continents, populated by activists world-wide from all cultures joining together in a common cause through non-violent direct action. The teams, donors and subscribers come from all sectors of society and a myriad of cultures. They have scientists, lawyers, doctors, journalists, students, engineers, parents and grandparents… a myriad of people necessary for founding universally legitimate and accessible campaigns. We count 11.6 million people amongst our subscribers, we have 2.8 million donors.

Koeberg Alert Alliance: is part of a global campaign against nuclear power. KKA is not only active in lobbying government and industry, but also in creating awareness about broader energy concerns facing South Africa through grassroots activism and public educational programmes.

Landmark Foundation:  Leopard and Predator Project works to stop the persecution of predators in South Africa with a special focus on leopards in the Cape. It has established a leopard rescue, rehabilitation, release and research program operating between Hermanus and Port Elizabeth in the mountains and coastal belt. The project works to expand wildlife friendly habitats, influence policy that affects these animals and is establishing a wildlife friendly brand called Fair GameTM to incentivize wildlife friendly farming. Since its start in 2004 the project has developed an extensive education program with school, adult, industry and consumer campaigns. Landmark Foundation is a conservation NGO, its mission is building the conservation economy.

Nature Network:  provides environmental learning experiences for children, teachers and corporates, in fact anyone who would like to reawaken their sense of wonder in the natural world. At schools children explore their school grounds through new eyes and experience that nature begins at their fingertips. Through enjoyable interactions they can come to understand their role in the ecosystem and respect all facets from the praying mantis to the rainstorm. Generally facilitated as an extra-mural and holiday programme, it can also be run as a curriculum-based weekly entra-mural or a once-off workshop that supports the current teaching theme.

Project 90×2030: is working to get South Africans to significantly change the way they live by the year 2030. These figures stem from George Monbiot’s thesis in his book “Heat” – that Industrialised nations needed to reduce their carbon emissions by 90% by 2030. However, given that South Africa is a developing country (with admittedly very high emissions!) we decided to shift the focus slightly to focus on something we can all control – the way that we live. By changing our lifestyles radically we can ultimately significantly reduce our carbon footprints.

UCT Green Campus Initiative: is a group of students at UCT who are dedicated to making the future world a brighter, greener place! The GCI has many projects which involve all areas of UCT greening – from raising awareness in individual students to making UCT management more sustainable. Some of our biggest projects include things such as a campus-wide recycling project and a Ridelink sustainable transport project. Throughout the year we have many events, such as our annual “Green Week” which raises awareness amongst the whole UCT population about sustainability. And we have loads of fun while doing it!

Deep Print: specialises in offering a full range of environmentally friendly print services including chlorine free, fully recycled papers, papers from sustainably farmed and waste by-product sources. They also print using vegetable based inks that are not harmful to our environment in a print process that uses the lowest possible amount of alcohol. The printing presses are energy efficient, that minimise on waste by-products. All waste products produced are effectively managed and recycled.

Mr. Recycle: from participating households, corporations and industry uses the collection and processing of our unwanted materials, of a social, environmental & financial value, to create jobs and skills training for previously employed and commercially unemployable people.
The collected materials are delivered to geographically distributed job creation centers, where job & skills training for commercially unemployable occurs in a safe and supervised conditions.

Labia Cinema: is situated at 68 Orange Street in the Gardens. It is the oldest independent art-repertory cinema in the country. Originally it was an Italian Embassy ballroom, and was opened by Princess Labia in May 1949 as a theatre for the staging of live performances. For the past twenty-nine years, it has been operating as a cinema on the alternative circuit appealing mainly to the more discerning viewer who enjoys its quality product and the charm of its old-world ambience.

Please be kind to the environment and think before you print.

Environmental Film Festival Brochure

Miss Representation

Miss Representation, a feature-length documentary about the portrayal of women in the media, will be shown in Cape Town at the Labia on Orange cinema on Sunday 18 September at 8:15pm, on Monday 19 September at 6:15pm and on Tuesday 20 September at 6:15pm.

 

Miss Representation will also be shown in Johannesburg at The Bioscope Independent Cinema on Friday 30 September at 7:30pm, on Monday 24 October at 7:30pm and on Tuesday 25 October at 7:30pm.

 

Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Miss Representation exposes how the mainstream media contributes to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence.

 

 

The film challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayal of women and girls, which make it difficult for them to achieve leadership positions, reach their full potential or feel powerful about themselves. As the most persuasive and pervasive force of communication in our culture, media is teaching yet another generation that a woman’s primary value lies in her youth, beauty and sexuality. It’s time to break that cycle of mistruth.

 

Miss Representation includes stories from teenage girls and provocative interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, activists and academics like Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Rosario Dawson and Gloria Steinem. The film offers startling facts and statistics that will leave you shaken and armed with a new perspective.

 

When it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, audiences were riveted and Oprah Winfrey acquired its broadcast rights. Don’t miss it!

 

All screenings will be followed by a facilitated audience discussion.

 

Tickets can be reserved by calling The Labia at 021 424 5927 or The Bioscope at 01 000 70119. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

 

This event is presented by the Labia, The Bioscope, Feministssa.com and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.

 

Contacts:

The Labia:
021 424 5927

The Bioscope:

Tel: 01 000 70119

www.thebioscope.co.za/

info@thebioscope.co.za

Feministssa.com

www.feministssa.com

Official film website:

www.missrepresentation.org

The Cradock Four

The Cradock Four, a dramatic documentary about the brutal murder of four prominent Eastern Cape anti-Apartheid activists, will be shown in Cape Town at the Labia on Orange cinema on Sunday 21 August at 6:15pm, on Monday 22 August at 8:30pm and on Tuesday 23 August at 6:15pm.

 

On a winter’s night in 1985, an Apartheid police hit squad assassinated four young activists in the Eastern Cape. Among South Africa’s most notorious political murders, the abduction and brutal killing of Matthew Goniwe, Fort Calata, Sparrow Mkonto and Sicelo Mhlauli became a major turning point in the country’s history, triggering a state of emergency and eventually leading to the release of Mandela.

 

 

Having taken seven years to complete, David Forbes’ award-winning feature documentary film The Cradock Four explores who the four victims were and investigates the circumstances that led to their deaths. The murders became one of Apartheid’s murkiest and most controversial episodes and the film allows the viewer to perceive the oppressive climate of the racist regime and looks at both inquiries into the murders (in 1989 and 1992), as well as into the investigations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) which denied amnesty to the killers. The Cradock Four weaves together interviews, archival footage, dramatic recreations and lyrical visual images to create a chilling story that reminds all of us of the many bloody sacrifices with which our democratic freedoms were won.

 

The Cradock Four is a must-see for anyone hoping to understand South Africa’s past, present and future.

 

Tickets are R20 and can be reserved by calling The Labia at (021) 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

 

This event is presented by the Labia and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.

 

Contacts:

The Labia:
021 424 5927

Official film website:
http://www.thecradockfour.co.za

Waiting For Superman

Waiting For ‘Superman’, a documentary about solutions to the education crisis, will premier in Cape Town at the Labia on Orange cinema on Sunday 24 July at 6:15pm, on Monday 25 July at 6:15pm and on Tuesday 26 July at 6:15pm.

Every morning, in big cities, suburbs and small towns across America – as in South Africa – parents send their children off to school with the highest of hopes. But a shocking number of students attend schools where they have virtually no chance of learning – failure factories more likely to produce drop-outs than graduates. And despite decades of well-intended reforms and huge sums of money spent on the problem, public schools haven’t improved markedly. Why? There is an answer. And it’s not what you think.


From the director of An Inconvenient Truth, Davis Guggenheim, comes Waiting for ‘Superman’, a provocative and cogent examination of the crisis of public education in the United States told through multiple interlocking stories – from a handful of students and their families whose futures hang in the balance, to the educators and reformers trying to find real and lasting solutions within a dysfunctional system. Tackling such politically radioactive topics as the power of teachers’ unions and the entrenchment of school bureaucracies, Guggenheim reveals the invisible forces that have held true education reform back for decades.

Considering the dire state of our own education system, this documentary is extremely relevant to South Africans. Don’t miss it!

 

Tickets are R20 and can be reserved by calling The Labia at (021) 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

 

This event is presented by the Labia, Symphonia and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.

Contacts:

The Labia:
021 424 5927

Symphonia:

http://www.symphonia.net

The War You Don’t See

The War You Don’t See, a documentary about the role of the media in war, will premier in Cape Town at the Labia on Orange cinema on Sunday 5 June at 6:15pm, on Monday 6 June at 8:30pm and on Tuesday 7 June at 6:15pm.

The War You Don’t See is powerful and timely investigation into the media’s role in war, tracing the history of embedded and independent reporting from the carnage of World War One to the destruction of Hiroshima, and from the invasion of Vietnam to the current war in Afghanistan and the disaster in Iraq.

As weapons and propaganda become even more sophisticated, the nature of war is developing into an electronic battlefield in which journalists play a key role, and civilians are the victims. But who is the real enemy?

John Pilger says in the film: “We journalists… have to be brave enough to defy those who seek our collusion in selling their latest bloody adventure in someone else’s country… That means always challenging the official story, however patriotic that story may appear, however seductive and insidious it is. For propaganda relies on us in the media to aim its deceptions not at a far away country but at you at home… In this age of endless imperial war, the lives of countless men, women and children depend on the truth or their blood is on us… Those whose job it is to keep the record straight ought to be the voice of people, not power.”

The screenings will be followed by a facilitated audience discussion.

Tickets are R20 and can be reserved by calling The Labia at 021 424 5927. We strongly recommended that you reserve tickets to avoid disappointment.

This event is presented by the Labia and While You Were Sleeping, a Cape Town-based non-profit film collective committed to bringing progressive, non-mainstream documentaries with important social, political and environmental messages to South African audiences.